7/26 Record Argus Article on                                          "Battling Addiction-Puzzle to Picture"

  • By 7016369785
  • 09 Aug, 2017

Speakers try to shed light on what addicts go through

To help an addict recover from addiction, Mark Britton believes you have to listen to the addict. He’s speaking from experience.

“Not only do I work in recovery, but I’m active in recovery,” he explained. He works as a certified peer specialist in the field, while celebrating nine years clean and sober himself.

What does he believe loved ones should hear from addicts?

“We do not plan to fail. I do not wake up every morning and say, ‘I’m going to fail,” he said. “I do however fail to plan.”

To help an addict recover from addiction, Mark Britton believes you have to listen to the addict. He’s speaking from experience.
Britton

At “Battling Addiction: Puzzle to Picture,” a Celebrate Recovery seminar Tuesday at Fresh Grounds in Greenville, Britton and two others in his field offered strategies for helping addicts through interventions and treatment by understanding their struggle.

Mary Pollock — an outpatient administrator for the Community Counseling Center — knows that can be a challenge. Having had addicts in her own life, she said loved ones can suffer right along with addicts.

Pollock

She explained that it can cause enough stress to bring on auto-immune disorders. From the struggles in her own life, she’s left with chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and other issues.

While she’s suffered, she stressed patience.

“You get convinced that the only thing that needs to happen to that person is that they need to stop using,” Pollock said. “Wrong.”

It’s not that easy.

“They’re expected to change everything in their lives,” she said, speaking of the people, places and things that they’ve surrounded themselves with and will now have to remove themselves from. “How well would any of us be able to do that?’

Once they stop using, and they work through treatment, they’ll face depression, and guilt, as they begin to be more aware of the things they’ve done.

Ben Zimmer of Bethel Life’s Celebrate Recovery welcomes the crowd to Tuesday night’s “Battling Addiction: Puzzle to Picture” seminar at Fresh Grounds in Greenville. Caleb Stright/R-A

“It’s the addict’s job to take care of themselves,” Britton explained. “They’re not to focus on pleasing you.”

That can be difficult to hear, but if someone has been hurt by an addict, he suggests that person seek counseling, “but do not lash out at the addict.”

“We already have enough shame and guilt on our own shoulders that we placed on ourselves,” he continued. “Please don’t add any more to the problem.”

He urged loved ones to take another tactic: “We’re not used to hearing good, positive feedback. I’ve already beat myself up over what I’ve done wrong.”By focusing on positives, he said, something good is bound to happen.

Carson

Something else loved ones should keep in mind — according to Rodney Carson, an outpatient therapist with Community Counseling — is that addiction is a disease.

“It took me a long time to understand the disease of addiction,” said Carson, who, celebrated 15 years of sobriety this year.

While it may be controversial to some, he explained, the option to use a drug is a person’s choice, “but once addicted, the urge to use drugs or alcohol feels as necessary as eating or breathing.”

Through understanding, they said, loved ones can help lead an addict into treatment.

Pollock explained that professionals will work with family and friends to help prepare them, including helping family members who are angry at the addict to work through those feelings.

“We need them to talk to that person rationally and with unconditional love,” she said.

That planning should also include having a bed ready in a rehab facility.

“That time between a crisis, and intervention, and getting treatment, that time is very short before they forget” why they need treatment, Pollock explained.

When it comes time to build a recovery plan, Britton said the addict has to be at the center, setting individual goals and setting measurable objectives.

“If you get anything out of what I’m saying tonight, know that the recovery plan I’m talking about is not a counselor’s plan. It’s not your parent’s plan,” he said. “The individual must be at the center.”

The addict knows what triggers their addiction, how to avoid those triggers and how to reduce their stress and prevent relapses.

While addicts are not good planners, he said recovery takes planning — they need to put together a crisis plan.

“This is the individual’s own words, the individual’s own plan,” Britton said. “This is often referred to as a relapse prevention plan.”

And someone the addict knows, trusts and relies on should have a copy of that plan.

Britton described that person in his life as, “that man that has my back, no matter what.”

Community Counseling Center Blog | Hermitage, PA

By 7016369785 09 Aug, 2017

To help an addict recover from addiction, Mark Britton believes you have to listen to the addict. He’s speaking from experience.

“Not only do I work in recovery, but I’m active in recovery,” he explained. He works as a certified peer specialist in the field, while celebrating nine years clean and sober himself.

What does he believe loved ones should hear from addicts?

“We do not plan to fail. I do not wake up every morning and say, ‘I’m going to fail,” he said. “I do however fail to plan.”

By 7016369785 08 Aug, 2017

Gateway Rehab's mission is to help all affected by addictive diseases to become healthy in body, mind and spirit. A key word in our mission is the word "all." We're not just about the recovering addict or alcoholic, but everyone involved in the processes of recovery: friends, family, therapists, counselors, the public in general, and others touched in some way by addiction.

To help connect those affected by addiction, Gateway Rehab is excited to announce the launching of The Roads to Recovery , a blog that will provide hope, inspiration, motivation, education and other insights about the world of addiction.

Our first blog entry focuses on the lifelong process of addiction. Future posts will help inspire and motivate those in recovery, as well as educate and inform others about addiction treatment and further aspects of the addiction industry. Additionally, there will be frequent posts featuring our founder, Dr. Abraham Twerski.

We invite you to connect with The Roads to Recovery by visiting www.gatewayrehab.org/blog . Our hope is that we provide an impactful account of the many roads to recovery. 


GET HELP NOW. CALL 800-472-1177

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By 7016369785 27 Jul, 2017

Preparing to go to college involves many things to consider, including living arrangements, transportation, finances, managing class loads, and managing healthcare using the resources at your chosen college. As a college student, it’s important to understand that good mental health practices can help you maintain your equilibrium during a period of significant growth and change.

The Stamp Out Stigma campaign was launched in 2014 as multiple agencies recognized that stigma about mental health kept people from accessing care. Contrary to common belief, 90 percent of those who seek help for mental health issues are able to greatly reduce their symptoms. Stigma about mental health care for those with or without a specific diagnosis is usually based in misunderstanding and myth. Those false beliefs about mental illness can cause significant problems, including a lack of understanding or support, discrimination, reluctance to get treatment early, or a loss of hope.


Other significant facts at the core of the Stamp Out Stigma campaign include:

   An estimated 26 percent of adults have a diagnosable

   mental illness in a given year; about 21 percent of children

   ages 9 to 17 have a diagnosable mental or addictive illness.

   One in two of us will have a mental health issue during our lifetime.

   Less than one-third of adults with a mental health issue will get help.


Stamp Out Stigma seeks to “reduce the stigma of mental illness and substance use disorders by talking about them.” Conversations are designed to:

   Recognize when you or your loved ones need help. Recognize the signs.

   Recognize when someone isn’t getting the help they need. 

   Recognize when stigma is creating a barrier to care. 

   Recognize the high prevalence of mental illness.


   Reeducate others to help them learn there is help and hope.